Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

At first I was hesitant to read Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood because it did not sound like a book I’d want to read in 2020. As someone who doesn’t watch tv (to clarify, I watch tv shows online; I don’t watch tv-tv), I had no idea whom Trevor Noah was, and I was confused how “funny” was one of the adjectives used to describe this book. So when my friend loaned me this book, I didn’t read it immediately. (My excuse was that I was finishing off another book, which was true anyway, but we all know it’s possible to switch off…) However, I’d had this book on my tbr a little too long for a borrowed book, so I read it (in the same year I borrowed it at that).

OK, so the book was funny. I couldn’t believe that I laughed at some moments—I was reading about apartheid after all. Reading through the highs and lows made me appreciate Trevor Noah’s storytelling skills. It’s as if he knew what his readers were feeling as he wrote, and to make sure we readers don’t feel the need to throw him a pity party, he’d ease the mood. What skill. I enjoyed reading so much that I looked Trevor Noah up and watched some The Daily Show episodes on YouTube. I think I should start watching talk shows. And now I’m thinking I probably should have gone with the audiobook. Or I should listen to the audiobook in the future.

Yes, so overall, Born a Crime is a great read. I should have mentioned sooner that Trevor Noah painted a good picture of his childhood South Africa, so, as a reader, I could easily imagine the streets he walked and the shenanigans he got into. This is a big deal for me. (When I’m not able to visualize the scenes, I feel meh about the book.) Where it got iffy for me was how the book ended. I’m all about reading books that feel complete, and I felt like the Born a Crime jumped to its ending. It didn’t feel seamless to me (huh, he skipped how he went from dj to comedian?) that I felt underwhelmed (wait, it’s done?) when I finished the book. I’m not sure what I’m looking for exactly, and this is a minor minor detail that I can let go of, so I will.

Verdict: This is a darn good book. I’m glad my friend loaned it to me, and I will gladly tell others to read it, too. I haven’t read too many stories about Africa (pretty sure I can count them with my fingers), so this was not only an entertaining but also an informative read.

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